I’m a Part of Art and Art’s a Part of Me

dales-symphony-2

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

“He’s no better than a charlatan, his art garbage.”

The board glared at me and the artist smiled.  The commission would go through despite my objections.

I had half-forgotten the incident until he called me down for a private viewing the night before it opened.

I remember walking into the lobby and looking up, but then it went dark.

Eyes open, I saw the so-called art all around me.  I was confused until I noticed the floor twenty-five feet below.  I tried to move, to scream, but in vain.

Everyone’s favorite part of the display is the realistic man.  Me.

– –

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo provided by © Dale Rogerson.  Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

My kingdom for a dozen more words ;)

45 thoughts on “I’m a Part of Art and Art’s a Part of Me

  1. pennygadd51

    I love the originality of this story. I love even more the way the vantage point of the photoprompt has inspired the story, either consciously or unconsciously. It’s exactly the sort of view your main character would have.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      I think Dale took the photo from a balcony, but when I saw it, my first thought was it looked like it was taken by someone trapped in the art installation. Why he’d be trapped there was were the story came from.

      Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      I’m not sure. You’d think he’d love the attention. For the short time he we will be conscious of it, that is… But, hey, he will have a type of immortality that people can only dream of…

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Do you have something against being encased in plastic and hung from a ceiling ;) lol Yeah, most artists are more passive aggressive (using your face for the dead evil thing) than aggressive aggressive (using your body in a long term static display)….

      Liked by 1 person

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  2. Jelli

    This made me think of an idea I had for the “hole” in NYC…you know the one…anyway, I thought the most fitting tribute would be just to leave it as it is/was and encase it in glass… you could walk out over the remains, literally, and see first-hand… well, maybe that’s just too real for most folk….

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      I know there are some bombed out places in Europe that are left as a memorial for the destructive power of war. And, of course, we have the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor. I’m not sure how much they would have had to clean up to be able to “plasticize” the rest of it. Maybe too real for a lot of people… I am glad that they at least left holes where the buildings’ foot prints were.

      Liked by 1 person

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      You’re right, don’t even think of messing with this guy. He is a very serious artist and doesn’t take too kindly to people dissing his craft.

      Like

      Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      He wasn’t the sharpest knife in the drawer, I’ll give you that. And since the artist’s uncle, one Don Corleone, not only presides over the board, but gave a glowing recommendation of the artist, well…. ;)

      Liked by 1 person

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      lol, I guess it does. I wasn’t sure if people would have problems figuring out what happened to the narrator. I guess I knew that people who read and write FF have good imaginations, so shouldn’t have worried.

      Liked by 1 person

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  3. Ocean Bream

    I had to read this several times to get it, but when I did, my did I let out a roar of laughter and disbelief. At first I thought the artist proved the narrator wrong, and created a wonderful 3D art display that took his breath away. And then, upon reading it again, clarity reared its head. My goodness but this is a fantastic and original piece. Certainly would not like to get on the wrong side of that artist. I would frame this, if I could. The imagery is perfection.

    Like

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      I wasn’t 100% sure if the idea would come through easily, which is why I said I needed a dozen more words. Glad that a reread or two got it across.

      Thanks. I think sometimes you have to be a little more polite when dealing with a cranky artist, like saying, “I’m sorry, but I don’t think the message of your excellent proposal fits what our institution is trying to convey. Perhaps next time,” would be better than calling the artist a charlatan. ;)

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      Reply
  4. rochellewisoff

    Dear Trent,

    One man’s art is another man’s nightmare. That’s one way to answer the art critic. I’ll have to remember that. ;) Good one.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    PS I think you need an apostrophe in your title. ‘art’s’

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Always be polite when talking to an artist. Perhaps, “I’m not sure if the message your fantastic art portrays fits in with our institution,” would have been better ;)

      I’ll have to correct that typo. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. trentpmcd Post author

      You need to be very careful on who you criticize and how you frame that criticism. Perhaps if he’d toned it down a bit ;) Live (for a very, very short time, in this case) and learn.

      Liked by 1 person

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