July Journey

PHOTO PROMPT © Russell Gayer

Waves of shimmering heat rose off of the broken asphalt.

I mopped my brow.

“Fields gone to weeds.”

“Yep.” Meg had said little beyond single syllables since we had crossed the fence.

We paused in shade where the Smith’s place once was.

Except that the lawn was now a hayfield, it looked fine, until we left.  The back half of the barn had collapsed.

That next oasis of trees beckoned.

A quick inspection relieved the worst of our fears.

Looking deeper, I could feel every year since we were evacuated after the accident.

“Home.” Meg had tears in her eyes.

***

word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Russell Gayer. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “Linky“.

***

I may not get to many stories this week as I will be journeying home after (Covid enforced) years away and so will be off line.

50 thoughts on “July Journey

    1. trentpmcd Post author

      Time does not stand still, but sometimes the changes are a bit much… Two days ago I was standing where a mansion converted into a museum stood until recently, now it is just a lawn. Thanks.

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  1. Bear

    I can imagine from this how the people of Chernobyl feel when they get the opportunity to return to their homes…even if for only a little while. Great story this week. Keep my hubby close in prayer. there’s some serious health issues at the moment, and he’s in hospital. Today, we meet with care team to decide how to proceed from here… I’m praying I can take him home. At least, maybe to be able to take him to Ohio for a second opinion.

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      I was thinking along the lines of something like Chernobyl.
      I hope your husband is doing better! I’ve been away almost a week, so haven’t seen any of your posts,if you posted something about him. (I was actually in Ohio, but up north).

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          1. Bear

            Me, too. It took him longer to come back this time. He had to use the walker for 3 days, and we thought he’d have to have one at home. that would have cost him his job for sure as he must lift 60lb+ printers and scanners all day, and climb a ladder to get them. Yesterday went okay. so thankful.

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        1. trentpmcd Post author

          There are more people, so more people effected, there is most likely more disasters and then there is 24×7 coverage from around the world. Between those three things, we do hear a lot more about it than we did years ago.

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      It is a tragic how often people are forced out, either by a natural disaster, or something man-made. I’m sure returning home is awful. Thanks.

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  2. GHLearner

    Very thought provoling and timely. My father was forced to leave his home after WWII (in the former Yugoslavia). When he returned to visit many years later, he didn’t recognize the place and never wanted to go back again. These places of the past only can go on existing in our memories.

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    1. trentpmcd Post author

      I think almost anybody in the world can become a refugee of sorts. I’m sure it was very tough for your father to return. You are right we can only return in memory and aren’t always doing ourselves a favor to try to do it physically.

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        1. trentpmcd Post author

          Have you ever heard the song “The Impression That I Get” by The Mighty Mighty Bosstones? Similar subject – the singer is asking himself how he would hold up if faced with a catastrophe.

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