Tag Archives: Friday Fictioneer

The Review

PHOTO PROMPT © Jennifer Pendergast
Perhaps the most frustrating issue with this book was the lack of characterization.  Although the surface details were drawn with care, the characters themselves came out as flat. Flat, flat, flat, totally flat.  You could not imagine an emotion more than a silly grin on any of them.  Even the dog and cat seemed more archetypes of the species than real, live, breathing animals.  I rate this book one star for lack of characterization alone. Not recommended.

Wow, that was pretty harsh.  What was your book about?

It was children’s book that featured a family of gingerbread people…  Totally flat.

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Jennifer Pendergast. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

Starry Night Over Saint-Rémy-de-Provence

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

I do not go for abstraction but can only paint what I see, and what I see is fascinating.  Do you not think the swirls of nature in the roots of trees is a work of beauty?  Or the wind-blown wheat in the field?

You say the lamp is clear and distinct, but you must be seeing it wrong, for there is an aura of light, a halo of being, around it.

And the stars in the sky, what wonders these points of light echoing through space!  The morning star on the horizon is almost as bright as the moon!

***

Vincent van Gogh was against abstraction and painted from nature. His sketchbook is full of fascinating drawings that people of his day thought boring. All of the points on his famous painting “Starry Night” can be identified, from Venus on the horizon to the constellation Aries. The moon was gibbous on the night represented, but he abstracted it for the composition. One thing, though – there are a lot of people who think Vincent had Cataracts or another eye ailment that caused him to see halos around bright objects since he always painted them with halos. It isn’t uncommon, so there is a very strong possibility…

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Dale Rogerson . Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

First Exploration

PHOTO PROMPT © Liz Young

While Jones and I explored the village, Hixon and Simmons went to investigate something interesting they saw.  Simmons said that the multi-rooted tree looked like a structure with a statue in the middle.  I laughed at Hixon’s description of a “sinuous man with outstretched arms, three sets of eyes and a long, pointed beard.”

Simmons and Hixon were long overdue, so, through the interpreters, we asked their whereabouts. 

The interpreters must have misunderstood.  It was just gibberish thanking us for the sacrifice and, since their god was satiated, for sparing one of their own.

Simmons and Hixon are still missing.

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Liz Young. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

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My opinion, ones you hear “Hixon’s” description of the tree, you can’t un-see it ;)

A Solitary Walk on the Beach

PHOTO PROMPT © CEAyr

It was cold, not frigid, but the wind was biting. Good, that meant I had the beach to myself.

The stark late winter sun turned the summer vacation site into a monochrome fantasy, an old silverplate photo from a bygone era.

I shared this world away with only a single soul who, thankfully, was walking the other direction, his form silhouetted by the low, southern sun.

Typically, a walk, any walk, gets the creative juices flowing, fires the imagination, sends a spark of creativity that wakes the system.  A walk on the beach?  Paradise for the muse!

But not today…

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © CEAyr. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

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Yeah, yeah, the missing muse story seems to be a common thread on FF, but some days we just draw a total blank.

A Hint, Please

PHOTO PROMPT © Roger Bultot

The apartment building was obviously a pre-Columbian artifact.

Just inside the unlocked door was the row of mailboxes. No buzzers.  How quaint.

Number 4 was Maria Mordella. Perfect.

Just outside Number 4, I held out the single rose, but my left hand, hidden in my jacket, held my 9 mm.

After an age of the Universe, a lady opened the door.

She was older than the building.

“Ms. Mordella?” A nod.  “Complements.” I gave her the rose and left.

It was only after a 34-year-old Maria Mordella met an unfortunate accident that I discovered Cruella Mordella really was my target.

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Roger Bultot. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

A Faded Rose from Days Gone By

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

I remember her clearly, the oversized suitcase, the faded rose on her jacket.

Later, at the diner, I asked a local about her.

For at least 30 years she had gone down to the bus station daily and waited for her lover to come take her away.

Funny thing was that the dark-haired stranger had jilted her long before, back in the 1950s.  She had waited patiently for him until she was 41 and began the crazy ritual.

I saw her the next day, the spring beauty just beneath the snowy old surface.

I wonder if she is still waiting?

***

Some of you (if you are old enough) may recognize this as coming from the song Delta Dawn (or try this if you like Tanya better than Helen), only I set it 30 years later, say 2003, when poor Dawn is in her 70s, not her 40s (the song says 41).

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Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Dale Rogerson. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

Cold Storage

PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

It was not a job I was looking forward to!

Aunt Margret was always more than a bit eccentric, and she had that side to her which, well, let’s just say that more than one family member said they were happy she never had any children.

Her storage unit, which was my responsibility, was not pleasant.

Damn, I’d have to call the county about disposing of hazardous waste. And what was up, did she rob a pharmacy?

So there’s her dog Baxter!

What did that say on the mail package, something about remains?

We always wondered where Uncle Harry went…

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Ted Strutz. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

Escape?

PHOTO PROMPT © Alicia Jamtaas

They are coming!

Shhhh.  Close your eyes.

I can’t sleep with them out there!

This bit of woods is special, a fairy forest.

Their guns are real, not fantasy!

Shhh.  They are fairies of light, of good.  The magic is powerful, but you need to believe.

Believe?  Now?

They have a trail in the trees, one our enemy can’t see, because they are rough and can’t believe. You need to believe.

I hear them!

Close your eyes and see.  We can catch the rail, escape.

But…

Shhh. Close your eyes.  Do you see?

Yes…

“Stop, or we’ll shoot!”

Let’s go.

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Alicia Jamtaas. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

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Remember – You do have to believe, keep that hope alive, even if you’ve reached the end of the track….

Flushing it All Away

PHOTO PROMPT © Trish Nankivell

“It’s cheap, industrial grade sandpaper bought in bulk.”

“Yes, but it is a cost on our budget, and someone is stealing it.”

I shook my head in disbelief.  Why would anybody steal the cheap toilet paper from the office bathroom?  But the evidence was there.

“Ok, lock it up even tighter.  And I thought keeping pens in stock would be hard…”

We found out soon enough that it didn’t matter how secure it was since Mr. Thornbill had access to all of the keys.

He also made over $200,000 a year.

I never figured out why he flushed his career.

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Trish Nankivell. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.

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Years ago someone at work was stealing TP. I don’t think they caught the thief, btu everyone knew the person doing it most likely made 3 times what the average American made. I always wondered why they risked their super high salary and nice career for the nastiest TP on the face of the Earth…. (If you didn’t notice, there is a lock on the roll in the photo…)

Joined

PHOTO PROMPT © Marie Gail Stratford

He set his water bottle down where there should have been wine and bread.  The hymnal in the liturgist’s chair had been untouched for almost a year.

On the other side of the room, across the empty pews, Marge sat at the piano.  Her eyes crinkled in a smile. He nodded and she began to play that traditional song.

He watched the screen as ‘Chelle joined Floyd in one little square.

Bob did a silent countdown with his fingers, 5,4,3…

At “one” he took off his mask, smiled at Bob and his camera.

“Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today…”

***

Word count = 100

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  This week’s prompt is here and uses a photo © Marie Gail Stratford. Read more or join in by following the InLinkz “linky“.